How To Make Clabbered Milk

A very tasty and healthy traditional food, clabbered milk, aka sour milk, is made from fresh cow milk. That’s it, nothing more.

While there is much debate about whether raw milk is healthy vs. unhealthy, let us rather not look to science for the answer, but use our own intuition and take a quick glance back in time when it was common to eat such a treat as this:

I am on the side of – raw milk is good for you – make that great for you!! Provided of course that you know where your milk is coming from. If the lady is grass fed, then that is the best. Grazing on an organic pasture…you may be onto something wonderful!

Not to mention that you trust the person who milks the cow; that they are clean, they wash their hands, their milking buckets are shimmering (not porous plastic!) and that they care for their animals well being. If you can find a farmer who is all of these things, then please do not hesitate to buy from him/her and enjoy your own clabbered milk.

How it is made is quite simple. Pour unpasteurized milk into a jar and keep it in a warm place with a lid sitting on top – not closed mind you – for about 3-4 days. When you begin to see streaks and the liquid begins to separate then it is time to dip in. A little mold may form and this is not a problem, it is quite edible, but if ever in doubt, you know the answer is to throw it out.

The cream on top is such a delight…

…as are the many glistening spoonfuls waiting underneath!

And the beauty of it all is the method of carefully scooping out the delicious clabbered milk. Slipping, sliding, not quite yogurt or kefir but slightly sour and effervescent all the same!

As a morning treat it goes great with a layer of boiled cabbage, topped by hash browns, fried onions and flax seeds. Add a couple of eggs (sunny side up!) and I will be over in a heartbeat!

 

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About Cheryl

Organic coffee lover, knitter and weaver of natural things, spinner of hemp and wool, stitcher of handmade garments, real food eater, gluten-free advocate, conservationist, homesteader, simple living enthusiast and so much more!

Comments

  1. Your posts lately are positively drool-worthy.

    • We are just getting started ;) Wild harvested bear garlic (ramsons) dishes are coming soon…